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About

The Australian Cyber Security Centre (ACSC) leads the Australian Government’s efforts to improve cyber security. Our role is to help make Australia the safest place to connect online.

We monitor cyber threats across the globe 24 hours a day, seven days a week so we can alert Australians early on what to do.

We provide advice and information about how to protect yourself and your business online. When there is a cyber security incident, we provide clear and timely advice to individuals, small to medium business, big business and critical infrastructure operators.

We work with our business, government and academic partners and experts in Australia and overseas to investigate and develop solutions to cyber security threats.

We have a national footprint of Joint Cyber Security Centres where we collaborate with nearly 200 industry, government and academic partners on current cyber security issues. We also work with law enforcement authorities to fight cybercrime.

We are part of the Australian Signals Directorate (ASD), which has a long history of cyber security excellence. For more information about the ACSC, visit our corporate page.

Cyber security is everyone’s responsibility. Let’s work together to make Australia the safest place to connect online.

ASD Leadership

Minister for Defence
Senator the Hon Linda Reynolds CSC

The Minister for Defence is responsible for the Australian Signals Directorate (ASD).

Director-General ASD

The Director-General leads ASD and is responsible to the Minister for Defence.

ACSC leadership

Head ACSC
Rachel Noble PSM

Rachel Noble

Rachel Noble is the Head of the Australian Cyber Security Centre in the Australian Signals Directorate.

Prior to taking up this appointment, Rachel was the Deputy Secretary Executive Group in the Department of Home Affairs overseeing the delivery of the Department’s executive functions including media, ministerial and Parliamentary services, integrity, security, risk and assurance as well as intelligence and the countering violent extremism centre. She previously led the Home Affairs Implementation Team to stand up the Home Affairs Portfolio. 

In 2014, Rachel was promoted to Deputy Secretary Policy Group in the Department of Immigration and Border Protection (DIBP) which included responsibility for trade, customs, immigration and international policy. This promotion followed the merger of DIBP with the Australian Customs and Border Protection Service (ACBPS) which Rachel joined in 2013 as the National Director Intelligence and Chief Information Officer. 

Rachel has also served throughout her career in the Defence Department.  Her SES appointments in Defence include First Assistant Secretary Ministerial and Executive Coordination and Communication, responsible for providing advice on Parliamentary, media, information management, records management policy, FOI and executive coordination issues; Assistant Secretary Governance, responsible for the overall governance and assurance framework for Defence; Assistant Secretary Americas, North and South Asia, Europe in the International Policy Division, and Deputy Chief of Facility at the Joint Defence Facility Pine Gap.

Rachel also held the position of National Security Chief Information Officer and Cyber Policy Coordinator in the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet and was responsible for improving information sharing among the national security community and coordinating whole of government policy on cyber issues. Rachel received a Public Service Medal for this work.

Rachel has a Masters of Business Administration in Technology Management and a Bachelor of Science with Honours. 

Accessibility

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  • it works well across the majority of popular web browsers
  • download times have been minimised as much as possible
  • all Australians, including those with a disability or with technical limitations, can access the information on our site.

Document formats

Documents can be downloaded from this web site in Portable Document Format (PDF) and other formats.

To access PDF documents, you need PDF reader software. People who use speech readers may need to access the Adobe Accessibility Resource Centre to be able to read the content of PDF documents.

If you are having difficulty accessing any of the information on this website, please contact us and we will arrange for the information to be made available to you in a more suitable format.

Help and comments

We are working towards accessible online documents.

If you are having difficulty accessing any of the information on this website or would like to send us your comments, please contact us.